Earlier, I mentioned that Bill Day, CEO of WhenU, has written about how adware companies must behave.  

Alex Morganis froths vituperatively. To wit:

“Bill Day, the CEO of WhenU, wrote up this piece of crap on ethics of adware. I know Bill, you have been doing a good job trying to clean up WhenU’s image, but really: Nothing will stop people from saying your business sucks; It does.” 

Oh dear.

ZDNet, on the other hand,  is encouraged:

“…other adware companies would do well to adopt WhenU’s philosophy and emulate some of their practices.”

Master spyware samurai PaperGhost is also encouraged, noting that he’s never actually even seen a stealth WhenU installation:

“It’s almost like taking your distribution in house solves 90% of the problems that people scream about so much (myself included)….Woo-woo! Here comes the clue-train! Next stop, Cluesville! Perhaps some of WhenU’s competitors would like to purchase a ticket..” 

Paretologic’s Sascha reasons dryly — and even goes the extra step of using literary analogs from Dickens and Conrad in his analysis:  

“My overall opinion of his essay is that it doesn’t say a whole hell of a lot, but what’s said is quite pleasant. Continuing the literary analogy, it’s the difference between Dickens and Conrad. With Dickens, you get a lot of words without much behind them — a great story leading into a good sleep, maybe. With Conrad, you’ve got economical language backed up by themes of race discrimination, the “white man’s burden,” colonialism, innate human savagery, all wrapped up in a mindbending frame narrative. “David Copperfield” is about 358 thousand words. “Heart of Darkness” is slightly longer than the printed directions on a can of ravioli. They’re both great books.”

(Well, any blogger who refers to Conrad – an author I admittedly worship – immediately gets extra props from me.)

And to all this, I’m left with no choice but to close this wandering blog entry with the Conrad quote: “All ambitions are lawful except those which climb upward on the miseries or credulities of mankind.” —Joseph Conrad

Alex Eckelberry
(Note: Some think that my Conrad quote was meant to be critical of WhenU.  It wasn’t meant that way at all. It was merely an implication of the real problems out there — the really bad guys who deserve the real vituperative froth)